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The 7th Annual Edgy Award Nominations

February 22, 2017 Leave a comment

7th-edgy-collage

Alas, it’s the most wonderful time of the year. Time to take stock of what’s been seen and shower you all with my opinions. On schedule for once.

To remind everyone, while there may only be 6 previous editions of the Edgies available online, the awards are cataloged by yours truly going all the way back to 1940. The recipients’ nomination and win counts are grouped according to each category, with the exception of the two music categories and the four acting categories being linked. So while Martin Scorsese may be getting only his 3rd nomination for producing, that certainly does not include the wealth of nominations he’s accumulated for directing.

Without further ado, here are my nominations for the best craftsmanship and talent on display in 2016:

__________

BEST ORIGINAL SONG

Audition
featured in “La La Land”
Music by Justin Hurwitz (2nd nom), Lyrics by Benj Pasik (2nd nom) and  Justin Paul (2nd nom)

City of Stars
featured in “La La Land”
Music by Justin Hurwitz (2nd nom), Lyrics by Benj Pasik (2nd nom) and  Justin Paul (2nd nom)

Drive It Like You Stole It
featured in “Sing Street”
Music and Lyrics by Gary Clark (1st nom)

Heathens
featured in “Suicide Squad”
Music and Lyrics by Tyler Joseph (1st nom)

Letter to the Free
featured in “13th”
Music and Lyrics by Common (2nd nom)

__________

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE

Arrival
Johann Johannsson (2nd nom, 1 win – “Sicaro”)

Jackie
Mica Levi (2nd nom)

Midnight Special
David Wingo (1st nom)

Moonlight
Nicholas Britell (1st nom)

The Witch
Mark Korven (1st nom)

__________

BEST MAKEUP and HAIRSTYLING

 Green Room
Nancy J. Hvasta Leonardi (1st nom) and Stephen Prouty (1st nom)

Hacksaw Ridge
Shane Thomas (1st nom)

The Light Between Oceans
Michael Marino (4th nom)

Suicide Squad
Alessandro Bertolazzi (1st nom) and Christopher Allen Nelson (1st nom)

The Witch
Francois Deganais (1st nom) and Michael J. Walsh (1st nom)

__________

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS

Arrival
Alexander Lafortune (1st nom) and Louis Morin (1st nom)

The BFG
Mark Gee (1st nom), Joe Letteri (9th nom, 5 wins – “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey,” “Rise of the Planet of the Apes,” “Avatar,” “LOTR: The Return of the King,” and “LOTR: The Two Towers”), Kevin McGaugh (1st nom) and Kevin Andrew Smith (1st nom)

The Jungle Book
Andrew R. Jones (3rd nom, 1 win – “Avatar”), Robert Legato (5th nom), Dan Lemmon (3rd nom, 1 win – “Rise of the Planet of the Apes”) and Adam Valdez (1st nom)

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story
Neil Corbould (4th nom, 2 wins – “Gravity” and “Gladiator”), John Knoll (6th nom, 1 win – “POTC: Dead Man’s Chest”), Hal T. Hickel (4th nom, 1 win – “POTC: Dead Man’s Chest”) and Mohen Leo (1st nom)

The Shallows
Scott E Anderson (4th nom, 2 wins – “Starship Troopers” and “Babe”), Nathan McGuinness (2nd nom) and David Nelson (1st nom)

__________

BEST SOUND EFFECTS EDITING

Arrival
Sylvain Bellemare (1st nom)

Hacksaw Ridge
Robert MacKenzie (1st nom) and Andy Wright (1st nom)

Midnight Special
Jeremy Bowker (1st nom) and Will Files (2nd nom)

A Monster Calls
Oriol Tarrago (1st nom)

 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story
David Acord (2nd nom, 1 win – “Star Wars: The Force Awakens”) and Matthew Wood (8th nom, 1 win – “Star Wars: The Force Awakens”)

__________

BEST SOUND EFFECTS MIXING

Arrival
Bernard Gariepy Strobl (1st nom) and Claude La Haye (1st nom)

Blair Witch
Andy Hay (1st nom) and Greg Townsend (1st nom)

 Green Room
Bob Chefalas (2nd nom, 1 win – “Apollo 13”) and Roland Vajs (1st nom)

Midnight Special
Will Files (2nd nom) and Brandon Proctor (1st nom)

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story
David Parker (7th nom, 1 win – “The Social Network”), Christopher Scarabosio (4th nom) and Stuart Wilson (3rd nom)

__________

BEST COSTUME DESIGN

Allied
Joanna Johnston (3rd nom)

Florence Foster Jenkins
Consolata Boyle (1st nom)

Jackie
Madeline Fontaine (1st nom)

 Silence
Dante Ferretti (1st nom)

The Witch
Linda Muir (1st nom)

__________

BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN

Arrival
Paul Hotte (1st nom) and Patrice Vermette (1st nom)

 Hail, Caesar!
Jess Gonchor (1st nom) and Nancy Haigh (8th nom)

Jackie
Veronique Melery (3rd nom, 1 win – “A Very Long Engagement”) and Jean Rabasse (1st nom)

La La Land
Sandy Reynolds-Wasco (2nd nom) and David Wasco (2nd nom)

The Witch
Mark Kirkland (1st nom) and Craig Lathrop (1st nom)

__________

BEST EDITING

American Honey
Joe Bini (1st nom)

Arrival
Joe Walker (4th nom)

Hell or High Water
Jake Roberts (1st nom)

Midnight Special
Julie Monroe (1st nom)

Moonlight
Joi McMillon (1st nom) and Nat Sanders (1st nom)

__________

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

Arrival
Bradford Young (2nd nom)

Jackie
Stephane Fontaine (1st nom)

La La Land
Linus Sandgren (1st nom)

Moonlight
James Laxton (1st nom)

The Witch
Jarin Blaschke (1st nom)

__________

BEST DOCUMENTARY FEATURE

13th
Spencer Averick (1st nom), Howard Barish (1st nom) and Ava DuVernay (1st nom)

Cameraperson
Kirsten Johnson (1st nom) and Marilyn Ness (1st nom)

Gleason
Seth Gordon (2nd nom, 1 win – “King of Kong: A Fistful of Dollars”), Mary Rohlich (1st nom) and Clay Tweel (1st nom)

Newtown
Maria Cuomo Cole (1st nom) and Kim A. Snyder (1st nom)

Tower
Megan Gilbride (1st nom), Keith Maitland (1st nom) and Susan P. Thomson (1st nom)

__________

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

Arrival
Eric Heisserer (1st nom)

Loving
Jeff Nichols (2nd nom)

Moonlight
Barry Jenkins (1st nom) and Tarell Alvin McCraney (1st nom)

Nocturnal Animals
Tom Ford (1st nom)

Silence
Jay Cocks (2nd nom) and Martin Scorsese (3rd nom, 1 win – “Goodfellas”)

__________

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

Everybody Wants Some
Richard Linklater (6th nom, 1 win – “Boyhood”)

Hell or High Water
Taylor Sheridan (2nd nom)

Jackie
Noah Oppenheim (1st nom)

Manchester by the Sea
Kenneth Lonergan (2nd nom)

Paterson
Jim Jarmusch (1st nom)

__________

 BEST ENSEMBLE CAST

American Honey
Chad Cox, Raymond Coalson, Veronica Ezell, Arielle Holmes, Gary Howell, Crystal Ice, Sasha Lane, Shia LaBoeuf, McCaul Lombardi, Shawna Ray Moseley, Will Patton, Johnny Pierce II, Isaiah Stone, Kenneth Kory Tucker, Christopher David Wright

Everybody Wants Some
Temple Baker, Will Brittain, Zoey Deutsch, Ryan Guzman, Tyler Hoechlin, Blake Jenner, J. Quinton Johnson, Glen Powell, Wyatt Russell, Juston Street

Manchester by the Sea
Casey Affleck, Anna Baryshnikov, Matthew Broderick, Kyle Chandler, Tate Donovan, Kara Hayward, Stephen Henderson, Gretchen Mol, Ben O’Brien, Michelle Williams, C.J. Wilson

Moonlight
Mahershala Ali, Patrick Decile, Naomie Harris, Alex R. Hibbert, Andre Holland, Jharrel Jerome, Janelle Monae, Jaden Piner, Trevonte Rhodes, Ashton Sanders

The Witch
Kate Dickie, Lucas Dawson, Bathsheba Garnett, Ellie Grainger, Ralph Ineson, Harvey Scrimshaw, Anya Taylor-Joy

__________

 BEST ACTRESS in a SUPPORTING ROLE

viola-davis-fences

Viola Davis – “Fences”
3rd nom

greta-gerwig-20th-century-women-copy

Greta Gerwig – “20th Century Women”
1st nom

naomie-harris-moonlight

Naomie Harris – “Moonlight”
1st nom

riley-keough-american-honey

Riley Keough – “American Honey”
1st nom

michelle-williams-manchester-by-the

Michelle Williams – “Manchester by the Sea”
3rd nom, 1 win – “Brokeback Mountain”

__________

BEST ACTOR in a SUPPORTING ROLE

mahershala-ali-moonlight

Mahershala Ali – “Moonlight”
1st nom

tadanobu-asano-silence

Tadanobu Asano – “Silence”
1st nom

ralph-fiennes-bigger-splash

Ralph Fiennes – “A Bigger Splash”
3rd nom, 1 win – “Schindler’s List”

shia-labeouf-american-honey

Shia LaBeouf – “American Honey”
1st nom

michael-shannon-nocturnal-animals

Michael Shannon – “Nocturnal Animals”
4th nom

__________

BEST ACTRESS in a LEADING ROLE

amy-adams-arrival

Amy Adams – “Arrival”
6th nom

annette-bening-20th-century-women

Annette Bening – “20th Century Women”
4th nom, 1 win – “American Beauty”

rebecca-hall-christine

Rebecca Hall – “Christine”
1st nom

ruth-negga-loving

Ruth Negga – “Loving”
1st nom

natalie-portman-jackie

Natalie Portman – “Jackie”
(4th nom, 2 wins – “Black Swan” and “Closer”)

__________

BEST ACTOR in a LEADING ROLE

casey-affleck-manchester-by-the

Casey Affleck – “Manchester by the Sea”
2nd nom

joel-edgerton-loving

Joel Edgerton – “Loving”
1st nom

andrew-garfield-silence

Andrew Garfield – “Silence”
2nd nom

jake-gyllenhaal-nocturnal-animals

Jake Gyllenhaal – “Nocturnal Animals”
4th nom, 1 win – “Brokeback Mountain”

viggo-mortensen-captain-fantastic

Viggo Mortensen – “Captain Fantastic”
1st nom

__________

BEST DIRECTOR

andrea-arnold-american-honey

Andrea Arnold – “American Honey”
1st nom

robert-eggers-witch

Robert Eggers – “The Witch”
1st nom

barry-jenkins-moonlight

Barry Jenkins – “Moonlight”
1st nom

pablo-larrain-jackie

Pablo Larrain – “Jackie”
1st nom

denis-villeneuve-arrival

Denis Villeneuve – “Arrival”
3rd nom

__________

BEST MOTION PICTURE of the YEAR

13th

Spencer Averick (1st nom), Howard Barish (1st nom) and Ava DuVernay (1st nom)

American Honey

Lars Knudsen (2nd nom), Pouya Shahbazian (1st nom) and Jay Van Hoy (2nd nom)

Arrival

Shawn Levy (1st nom), Dan Levine (1st nom), David Linde (1st nom) and Aaron Ryder (1st nom)

Jackie

Darren Aronofsky (2nd nom), Paul Franklin (2nd nom), Ari Handel (1st nom) and Mickey Liddell (1st nom)

Manchester by the Sea

Matt Damon (1st nom), Chris Moore (1st nom) and Kevin J. Walsh (1st nom)

Moonlight

Dede Gardner (2nd nom, 1 win – “12 Years a Slave”), Jeremy Kleiner (2nd nom, 1 win – “12 Years a Slave”) and Adele Romanski (1st nom)

Paterson

Joshua Astrachan (2nd nom) and Carter Logan (1st nom)

Silence

Barbara De Fina (2nd nom), Randall Emmett (1st nom), Martin Scorsese (3rd nom) and Irwin Winkler (6th nom, 2 wins – “Goodfellas” and “Raging Bull”)

Tower

Megan Gilbride (1st nom), Keith Maitland (1st nom) and Susan P. Thomson (1st nom)

The Witch

Daniel Bekerman (1st nom), Lars Knudsen (2nd nom), Rodrigo Teixeira (1st nom) and Jan Van Hoy (2nd nom)

__________

NOMINATION TALLY

Films with more than 2 nominations a piece:

Arrival – 11
Moonlight – 9
Jackie – 8
The Witch – 8
American Honey – 6
Manchester by the Sea – 5
Silence – 5
La La Land – 4
Midnight Special – 4
13th – 3
Loving – 3
Nocturnal Animals – 3
Rogue One: A Star Wars Story – 3
20th Century Women – 2
Everybody Wants Some! – 2
Green Room – 2
Hell or High Water – 2
Paterson – 2
Suicide Squad – 2
Tower – 2

Natalie Deserved the Oscar. End of Story.

March 29, 2011 Leave a comment

This story has plagued both publications and the blogosphere alike for the last week, and damn it, it really needs to stop. This is one of the most annoying, ill-founded, and downright inappropriate smear campaigns against a great performer in recent memory. First off, even if Natalie Portman didn’t train for and perform a great deal of dancing in “Black Swan,” that’s not why people do or should win Oscars (unless you’re Jennifer Hudson, who sang her way to an Oscar in ’06 since she sure as hell can’t act worth a damn). People win Oscars for acting, and that’s what Portman did. She acted her ass off.

I mean seriously, people. This is horrible. It’s like saying: “I actually heard a rumor once that Natalie did not do her own makeup for the final scene. Nor did she even design her own costumes. I’m appalled. She didn’t deserve the Oscar.” All of these accusations are nearly as absurd as expecting an actress to somehow cram fifteen to twenty years of dancing experience into one year of film training.

Of course, this all started when Portman’s apparent “dance double,” Sarah Lane, complained that the actress only performed five percent of the dancing in the final cut of the film. I’ve only seen the film once, but running it through my head, something about that figure automatically sounds fishy. Maybe this dancer got a raw deal, simply being credited as a hand double and an extra, but way to go by turning yourself into an international joke by insinuating that Natalie was a fraud in the film.

Meanwhile, director Darren Aronofsky is dancing to a different drumbeat, defending his actress and her career-defining performance to the last stroke. In an interview with the UK Guardian, he claims that Portman did in fact do eighty to ninety percent of her dancing in the film, putting the double to shame. In an excerpt from the piece, he says:

However, Aronofsky has issued a statement claiming Portman performed 80 to 90% of the routines seen in the final cut of his film. “Here is the reality,” he said. “I had my editor count shots. There are 139 dance shots in the film. 111 are Natalie Portman untouched. 28 are her dance double Sarah Lane. If you do the math, that’s 80% Natalie Portman.”

He added: “What about duration? The shots that feature the double are wide shots and rarely play for longer than one second. There are two complicated longer dance sequences that we used face replacement. Even so, if we were judging by time over 90% would be Natalie Portman.”

Aronofsky states that Portman did, in fact, dance on point, a difficult technique which was also said to be played false by Lane. The Guardian article also features costar Mila Kunis defending all of Portman’s performance, as well, stating that she “danced her ass off.”

What it all comes down to is CUT THE S#!T. This plague of defamation must end. I can only hope that in the end, it will only help to bolster the legacy of Portman’s performance when people realize how much she actually worked long and hard for this role. Shame on all who say otherwise.

Check out the opening scene from “Black Swan” below, re-color corrected and cut to a different song. Also, you can view the entire Guardian article, here.

The 83rd Academy Awards – Postgame Coverage

March 2, 2011 1 comment

Well, not that I’ve gotten all of that out of my system, I think it’s fitting to move on to the rest of the awards presented Sunday night. As usual, they included some good, some bad, and some just downright ugly.

As far as the the show, itself, was concerned, I’d rate it about a four out of ten. Even in the face of enormous support for them, I remember stating a long time ago that selecting Hathaway and Franco as a hosting pair was just a bad idea. Finally, my convictions have been exonerated. I’m not sure what exactly was going on here, but it didn’t work. I know that Franco is not an idiot, so he was either bored, stage-frought or stoned out of his mind. Whichever path he took, he just was not there in any form of personality. Meanwhile, Anne Hathaway went way over the top in an attempt to overcompensate for Franco’s absence. A few funny lines, but overall, it was a mess.

Yes. On to the awards. I’ve already made my thoughts clear on the results of Best Picture and they are quite strong. However, if there were a race that I would have to object to, equally, if not moreso, it would have to be Best Director. The idea of Tom Hooper winning the award amongst this crop of nominees is more than absurd, it’s hilarious. Hooper’s effort in “The King’s Speech” did not merit him an Oscar and his career is substantially insufficient for such an honor. The Oscar, hands-down, should have gone to David Fincher. The man knew exactly what he wanted and got it to an extent of perfection that you don’t often see in films.

It’s true that David Fincher does not need an Oscar to make it in this industry. He’s widely considered one of the finest directors working in Hollywood and will go on to make extraordinary films. However, there is the notion of awarding in the moment. It’s quite possible that Fincher may never reach the level of perfection that he achieved here. If there’s one thing that history should have taught the Academy, it’s that Martin Scorsese should never have had to wait until “The Departed” to win an Oscar. While being in the company of “Raging Bull” and “Goodfellas” isn’t necessarily a bad thing, it’s sad to imagine that no matter what Fincher eventually wins for, it will be considered a “re-ward.” The Oscars should understand a man’s masterpiece when it’s put in front of their faces.

The only other moments of true disgust occurred in the design categories, which were monopolized by the showy monstrosity that was Tim Burton’s “Alice in Wonderland.” While I predicted Colleen Atwood to take home yet another Oscar for her work on the costumes, I was really kind of hoping that it wouldn’t happen. And seeing the ridiculously gaudy, and really quite ugly, production design conquer some beautiful works of art was a horrible sight. This is an award that I actually would have preferred go to “The King’s Speech,” at least over this. However, it was “Inception”‘s intricately inventive world that was snubbed. Tim Burton’s latest is a film that really shouldn’t be able to hold the title “Academy Award Winner,” especially when none of the design was even built. I mean it’s an entire movie filmed on a green screen.

Most of the great awards of the night, sadly, were the ones that were quite expected. “Toy Story 3” was a lock for the win since the day it opened in theaters. “The Social Network” won for Best Editing because there was really no competition anywhere near in the same ballpark. If a single person didn’t vote for Aaron Sorkin’s absolutely flawless script, I might consider them clinically insane. “Inception”‘s three tech wins were all well-deserved, but it was difficult not to see that sweep occurring, much in the same style as such special-effect wonders as “King Kong,” “The Matrix” and “Jurassic Park.”

It’s hard to argue with the acting wins, even if not a single one of them has differed once, going back from the SAG, to the Golden Globes and the BFCA. The only performer who’s Oscar went hand in hand with an Edgy was Natalie Portman. A truly astonishing performance, the one aspect of “Black Swan” in which recognition is absolutely essential. Firth is definitely not my first choice for Best Actor. However, it’s the type of role that’s difficult not to respect and an actor difficult not to adore. Leo and Bale were both phenomenal and also get props for having the most out-of-control acceptance speeches of the year.

I won’t lie that I have to fly in the face of popular opinion on one issue. I’m very happy that the Academy went back to showing clips for each of the acting nominees rather than just having a bunch of people on stage talking about them. While, it must be nice for the performer to hear their peers praise their work, it’s just another gratuitous way of celebrities patting each other on the back and toasting to their own successes. It’s really kind of grotesque, in a way. Besides, I always looked forward in suspense as to which clip the producers would choose to represent each actor. It’s also a way to present an example of each person’s work for those viewers who haven’t seen all of the performances and in a way that words just can’t substitute.

Perhaps the most bittersweet moment of the night was seeing Wally Pfister receive the award for Best Cinematography. If I was to pick a handful of cinematographers whose work has truly left a mark on the last decade of cinema, Pfister would be at the head of the pack. He is a true master of camera movement and has a perfect eye for lighting a shot. “Inception” is a great exhibition of both these magnificent talents and I couldn’t be happier for him. Yet, one has to wonder, at this point, if the Academy will ever be willing to finally bestow Roger Deakins with his first Oscar. He is one of the most respected directors of photography in the industry, living or dead, and his record with Oscar is now zero for nine. One year, they are really going to have to stop passing him over.

There was one moment of the night that will always live in my memory as a true favorite and that was Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross taking the stage. Even if the Academy isn’t ready to come out of their comfort zone in Best Picture, one really has to give them props for awarding one of the most unorthodox and creative soundtracks ever scored for a substantial film. Reznor and Ross engineered a combination of both traditional rhythms with radical themes of electronic rock tracks. Now that all is said and done, it’s hard to imagine any other type of music narrating “The Social Network.” In a field of fantastic nominees, this year, this is a score that truly stands out. Well done, Academy. One of your better decisions.

Well, that’s my take on the 83rd Annual Academy Awards. While it’s hard to let go of, I believe it’s about time to move on. I believe we have at least a few days time before the race for next year’s Oscars begins, and I’ve got a lot of good stuff in store. Stay tuned.

My Final 83rd Oscar Predictions

February 27, 2011 Leave a comment

Well, folks, it’s all come to an end. These will be my final predictions for this year’s Academy Awards. It has been a long year and a tough year, one with one of the biggest tide-turnings in the history of film. It’s hard to see the best, as well as my favorite, movie go from being on top of the world to fighting for its life. I still believe that it will come out victorious in the end, but I will be hanging on to that prediction by my fingernails until the first ballot is called.

This year, some of the races are a foregone conclusion. Both lead acting categories were practically finalized months ago, and the supporting awards are pretty close to sewn up, as well. You can probably take both of the screenplay awards to the bank, as well, along with animated feature. I also feel pretty confident calling both sound categories and visual effects for a single film to capture.

Several awards are thoroughly nagging on me and will be to the very end. One will be the very first ballot called, so we won’t have to wait long. Art Direction is in a very close. “The King’s Speech” is definitely the front runner with both “Inception” and “Alice in Wonderland” biting at its heals. It’s interesting to note that in all the times that a Tim Burton film has been nominated for this particular award, it has never lost. That statistic goes hand in hand with another, in that every time one such movie has been nominated for Best Costume Design, it has never won. I plan to go against that logic tonight, even as it faces a very strong contender in “The King’s Speech.”

Along with Design, both of the music categories have been severely nagging at me, as well. In Original Score, there is a showdown between the two Best Picture frontrunners, the stylish and innovative music in “The Social Network” vs. the quiet, beautiful, but really quite boring tones of “The King’s Speech.” Meanwhile, “Inception” and “How to Train Your Dragon” both have potential as spoilers. In Best Original Song, Randy Newman is looking for his second Oscar with the song “We Belong Together” from “Toy Story 3,” while A.R. Rahman seeks his third (he won two for “Slumdog Millionaire). Either has potential.

Finally, we come to the big one. It’s funny how after everything else, Best Picture ends up being the closest race of all. In one corner, there’s “The King’s Speech,” the heart-warming, generally-appealing historical epic. In its pocket are the PGA, the DGA and the SAG Ensemble. It’s opposition: “The Social Network,” is the original, stylized, cold-shouldered work of art. Behind it is the Golden Globe, the BFCA, the WGA, the ACE and basically every critics award for Best Picture that exists. It will be a fight to the finish. The one question the Academy has to ask themselves now.

Do they want to be smart or do they want to be saps? I still have faith.

My final predictions:

BEST PICTURE
Winner: “The Social Network”
Runner-Up: “The King’s Speech”

BEST DIRECTOR
Winner: David Fincher – “The Social Network”
Runner-Up: Tom Hooper – “The King’s Speech”

BEST ACTOR
Winner: Colin Firth – “The King’s Speech”
Runner-Up: Jesse Eisenberg – “The Social Network”

BEST ACTRESS
Winner: Natalie Portman – “Black Swan”
Runner-Up: Annette Bening – “The Kids Are All Right”

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Winner: Christian Bale – “The Fighter”
Runner-Up: Geoffrey Rush – “The King’s Speech”

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Winner: Melissa Leo – “The Fighter”
Runner-Up: Hailee Steinfeld – “True Grit”

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
Winner: “The King’s Speech”
Runner-Up: “Inception”

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
Winner: “The Social Network”
Runner-Up: “Toy Story 3”

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
Winner: “In a Better World”
Runner-Up: “Incendies”

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE
Winner: “Toy Story 3”
Runner-Up: “How to Train Your Dragon”

BEST DOCUMENTARY FEATURE
Winner: “Inside Job”
Runner-Up: “Exit Through the Gift Shop”

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
Winner: “True Grit”
Runner-Up: “Inception”

BEST EDITING
Winner: “The Social Network”
Runner-Up: “The King’s Speech”

BEST ART DIRECTION
Winner: “The King’s Speech”
Runner-Up: “Inception”

BEST COSTUME DESIGN
Winner: “Alice in Wonderland”
Runner-Up: “The King’s Speech”

BEST SOUND MIXING
Winner: “Inception”
Runner-Up: “The Social Network”

BEST SOUND EDITING
Winner: “Inception”
Runner-Up: “TRON: Legacy”

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS
Winner: “Inception”
Runner-Up: “Alice in Wonderland”

BEST MAKEUP
Winner: “The Wolfman”
Runner-Up: “Barney’s Version”

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE
Winner: “The Social Network”
Runner-Up: “The King’s Speech”

BEST ORIGINAL SONG
Winner: “We Belong Together” from “Toy Story 3”
Runner-Up: “If I Rise” from “127 Hours”

BEST ANIMATED SHORT FILM
Winner: “The Gruffalo”
Runner-Up: “Day and Night”

BEST DOCUMENTARY SHORT FILM
Winner: “Strangers No More”
Runner-Up: “Poster Girl”

BEST LIVE-ACTION FILM
Winner: “Na Wewe”
Runner-Up: “The Confession”

Enjoy the Oscars folks!

The 1st Annual Edgy Award Winners

February 24, 2011 2 comments

Well, Hollywood’s biggest night is this Sunday. However, the biggest night for this particular blog is right here and now. I announced the nominees for this year’s Edgy Awards last week and it’s now time to bestow said honors upon the winners. As the results will show, several films have proven their excellence by taking a high number of awards. However, much of the love has been equally spread out. Interestingly, four films out of my Top Ten List went home empty handed, while a film that I would consider quite a disappointment still propelled itself to a win in one category.

Overall, these awards are a very accurate depiction of my opinion on films this year. Now, if only the Oscars had this type of taste. However, if the Oscars always matched exactly what one person thought the best, where’s the fun in that? That kind of reality would eliminate the fun of having an opinion in the first place. It would do away with genuine discussion and healthy argument over film. And, most importantly, it would take away from making this site it’s own unique vision.

NOTE: I have been awesome enough to include a video selection for each award chosen, either a short documentary describing the category or a clip from the film that best exhibits what it has been awarded. However, I can not guarantee that any of the clips selected do or do not contain spoilers. Therefore, if you haven’t yet seen the chosen film, do not watch the clip. Simple.

Also, a number of the clips do not allow embedment. But don’t give up, so easily. Just click the link and it will take you directly to the video’s Youtube link where you can view it. Once again, simple.

Without further adieu, here are the winners of the 2011 Edgy Awards!

 

 

BEST ORIGINAL SONG

 

“If I Rise” featured in “127 Hours”

Music by A.R. Rahman and Lyrics by Dido and Rollo Armstrong

Runner-Up: “Bred and Buttered” featured in “Winter’s Bone”

Read more…

“Natalie Portman Cries A Lot”

February 16, 2011 1 comment

A friend of mine, Mike Eisenberg over at Screen Rant, created this tickling montage. Natalie Portman is a great actress, maybe one of the best of her generation, and in “Black Swan,” she displays perhaps the finest work of her career. However, some people may not realize (though after seeing this, it’s impossible to deny) that she cries in probably about ninety percent of her screen appearances. I mean, wow. Those who know here movies will see clips from “Leon: The Professional,” “Where the Heart Is,” Mr. Magorium’s Wonder Emporium,” “Closer,” “Goya’s Ghosts,” “The Other Boleyn Girl,” “Brothers,” “Revenge of the Sith,” “V for Vendetta,” “Heat” and “Cold Mountain.” All Natalie Portman. All crying. All day.

Crying on screen is fantastic talent, but one has to wonder if that line on her resume is bolded, italicized and underlined. I only spent the montage waiting for the line in “Garden State”: “I look forward to a good cry. It feels pretty good.”

Let’s all shed a tear with Natalie Portman and hope that she continues to deliver great work, post-Oscar.

“King’s Speech” and “Social Network” Win at BAFTAs

February 14, 2011 Leave a comment

It kind of went without saying that “The King’s Speech” was destined to rape the living hell out of these awards since September when the film debuted at the Venice Film Festival. Apparently, it’s the most widely popular and acclaimed British film since, I don’t know….”Lawrence of Arabia,” though I surely don’t understand it. This is a big moment for our English brethren across the Atlantic to pat themselves on the back. A pretty strong example of this is how the British Academy Awards actually have two awards for Best Picture: Best Film and Best British Film. For years they have made it so that no film wins both awards, but rather spread the wealth. Guess what’s the first film ever to take home every Best Picture award on the market?

“The King’s Speech” ended up taking home seven awards, total. Aside from being the first film to achieve the accolade above, the film also became the first film in BAFTA history to take home three awards for acting. Colin Firth, of course, nailed the Best Actor win (not even the real King George risen from the dead could stop Firth from sweeping straight to Oscar glory). However, the film also won supporting awards for both Geoffrey Rush and Helena Bonham Carter. While Geoffrey Rush is definitely picking up a bit of steam, don’t expect a repeat in the American Academy Awards. If anyone can unseat Melissa Leo, it will be Hailee Steinfeld (sadly).

Despite all of the above, “The King’s Speech” was not the only big winner of the night. Many believed that “The Social Network” was TKOed, not just for these awards, but for year, as well. Some of this ideology was attributed to the film only garnering six nominations (compared to “The King’s Speech”‘s fourteen) or perhaps the heavy American sentiment laden in the work. However, all of this was rendered false, last night, when “The Social Network” won three very substantial awards: Best Editing, Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Director for David Fincher. If the Brits won’t even give their award to newcomer Tom Hooper, I can’t see any reason why the American awards circuit would stoop that low.

Check out the full list of winners, below:

BEST FILM: “The King’s Speech”
BEST DIRECTOR: David Fincher – “The Social Network”
BEST LEADING ACTOR: Colin Firth – “The King’s Speech”
BEST LEADING ACTRESS: Natalie Portman – “Black Swan”
BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR: Geoffrey Rush – “The King’s Speech”
BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS: Helena Bonham Carter – “The King’s Speech”
BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY: “The Social Network”
BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY: “The King’s Speech”
BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY: “True Grit”
OUTSTANDING BRITISH FILM: “The King’s Speech”
OUTSTANDING BRITISH DEBUT: “Four Lions”
BEST EDITING: “The Social Network”
BEST ORIGINAL SCORE: “The King’s Speech”
BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN: “Inception”
BEST COSTUME DESIGN: “Alice in Wonderland”
BEST SOUND: “Inception”
BEST VISUAL EFFECTS: “Inception”
BEST MAKEUP AND HAIR: “Alice in Wonderland”
BEST SHORT FILM: “Until the River Runs Red”
BEST SHORT FILM, ANIMATION: “The Eagleman Stag”
BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM: “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo”
BEST ANIMATED FILM: “Toy Story 3”
RISING STAR AWARD: Tom Hardy