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4th Annual Edgy Award Winners

February 5, 2015 Leave a comment

4th Edgy Collage Final

I didn’t commit to writing up my Top Ten List for last year. Under normal circumstances, one would think such circumstances would provide an element of suspense going through these awards. Any other year, that might be true, but unfortunately there was a heavyweight that didn’t have much trouble cleaning up the lion’s share of the categories. In fact, not since “The Return of the King,” and before that “Schindler’s List.” has a single film taken  out the competition as extensively as, well…you’ll find out soon enough.

I’ve tried to provide as many video clips as possible, to help to justify my decisions here. No winner would also be complete without a runner-up because my labor of indecision is insurmountable. Finally, once you’ve seen what’s been crowned the top honors, keep scrolling for some fun extra awards that will tie up any loose ends of 2014.

Without further adieu, here are the winners of the 4th Annual Edgy Awards:

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BEST ORIGINAL SONG

“Young and Beautiful” featured in “The Great Gatsby”

Music and Lyrics by Lana Del Ray

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o_1aF54DO60]

 Runner-Up: “The Moon Song” featured in “Her”

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Read more…

The 2nd Annual Edgy Award Nominations

February 21, 2012 2 comments

One of the primary focuses of this site is to analyze and report on each year’s film awards race, and many of you know this to be my true passion in life. However, if there’s one thing I enjoy more than following the Oscars, it’s making my own. Therefore, it has become a tradition of mine to gather up all my favorite aspects of the year’s filmmaking, break them down into nominations and then award what I believe to be the best of the year. And while I’ve been doing this for a long time, The Edge of the Frame gave me a chance to name them. Therefore, I present to you fine readers the 2nd Annual Edgy Award Nominations.

This year has certainly delivered a mixed bag of finalists. A total of 39 films received nominations, although 19 of those only garnered a single nomination apiece. While some categories may have some resemblance to the Academy’s choices (sometimes, they do actually make wise decisions), there are some striking differences. Thank goodness for that, for as a film critic, if my picks matched up with the Oscars, I wouldn’t be able to respect myself in the morning. Many of you have already seen my choices for Best Picture, what with my Top Ten List being released earlier in the week, and you’ll have noticed that only three films also find themselves in Oscar’s top nine ballot. Also, for the first time in my long history of doing this, not a single one of my Best Director nominees overlaps with the Academy’s.

A few notes to cover before we get started. I’ve used a similar format as last year’s nominations, listing out each nominee by name, instead of just the films themselves. Now, some of you will be bound to wonder how, if these are only the 2ND Annual Edgy Nominations, some individuals will have more than 2 mentions under their belts. The answer is because I have a slate of personal awards for each year going back over seven decades. I’ve got endless spreadsheets cataloging my choices for film winners from long before I was even born, I just don’t have the means (yet) to make those available to the public. The annotations refer to the amount of past nominations each individual has had in their respective category, except for performers who’s mentions overlap with all the other acting categories.

Now, for any readers who need more info, don’t understand or just think I’m full of it, I’ve provided a link to a separate document which holds a complete list of every single one of this year’s nominees, coupled with a complete record of their Edgy nominations and wins. Have I gone overboard with these things? Absolutely, but I have an anal retentive need to be comprehensive, not to mention that I have a devotion to all things statistical. Hope at least one person gives it a look.

One other thing to point out is that, this year, I have refrained from creating categories for both Best Foreign Language Film and Best Animated Film. To be honest, I just haven’t seen enough foreign fare to make up an accurate barometer of the year’s best. As far as animation goes, I honestly just avoided this year, practically, all together. Just a weak field that I didn’t bother focusing my income towards. I did, however, add a full category for Best Ensemble Cast. I do believe that when a film pulls off an effective ensemble performance, it’s worth taking note of because it help’s define the film and its quality. If only the Oscars shared this opinion.

So, without further ado, here are the 2011 nominations:

 

BEST ORIGINAL SONG

“The Living Proof”
featured in “The Help”
Music and Lyrics by Mary J. Blige (2nd Nom)

“Marcy’s Song”
featured in “Martha Marcy May Marlene”
Music and Lyrics by Jackson C. Frank (1st nom)

“Never Be Daunted”
featured in “Happythankyoumoreplease”
Music and Lyrics by Jaymay (1st nom)

“Shelter”
featured in “Take Shelter”
Music and Lyrics by Ben Nichols (1 nom)

“Think You Can Wait”
featured in “Win Win”
Music and Lyrics by The National (1st nom)

Read more…

One Year and Counting…

October 13, 2011 Leave a comment

Well folks, I never thought I would be able to hold out this long. I’ve made blogging attempts before that have come and gone. Either the site never caught on or I just lost interest completely. However, this time around, the adverse of both of those scenarios has happened and I’m proud to report that The Edge of the Frame has now been operating for over a year.

It may not be the exact same blog that it was twelve months ago. Certain changes and alterations have been made to the format and content. However, the integrity of the site and its mission statement remain intact and unwavering. The Edge of the Frame is committed to bringing you up to date Hollywood and awards news while also filling your ears with my own opinions and musings on the world of cinema, old and new.

Now, with this milestone, I hope to revitalize the site and bring back some aspects that have waned in recent months. Perhaps the most glaring shortfall has been the lack of reviews for new select films that I see in theaters. I will attempt to reach a certain quota of movie reviews each month. Along with that, I plan to reinstitute the “New Additions” feature, giving short tidbits for all of the movies that I view and add to my Fields List. Hopefully, I can throw in a few more creative lists, as well.

All the while, we are now entering the Oscar season, a time when my reporting-Tourettes for will be in full swing. Therefore, you’ll be sure to find every critics’ award, juicy announcement and game-changing update that you could ever hope to find right here. It’ll be yet to see if a clear frontrunner emerges that will have this site in its cheering section. I don’t think I have to remind anyone of what that film happened to be last year.

Speaking of the awards race, I believe I’ll kick off this new year with my newest round of Oscar predictions. Watch for those to appear later today. Until then, I thank you all for you’re continuing support of the site. From last October till now, my viewership per month has increased ten times over. It’d be nice to see that same escalation one year from now, and that event will only transpire with the help from all of you. Thank you.

EW 25 Movies They “Can’t Wait to See”

August 17, 2011 Leave a comment

I really do enjoy Entertainment Weekly’s periodic lists. Last year, they announced what they felt were the ten most undeserving Best Picture wins of all time and I offered my own up for comparison. Also, I’ve thought that their piece on the 25 most controversial films ever made is worth taking another look at every once in a while. Every year, I look forward to their categorical opinions on filmmaking.

Recently, they released a preview list of some of their most anticipated films of the upcoming Oscar season. The article features some exclusive photos and info that I haven’t come across for certain features. In particular, my excitement towards Clint Eastwood’s Hoover biopic “J. Edgar” has reached a fever pitch. News that Leonardo DiCaprio will be donning a large amount of prosthetic make up to portray the crime-buster in his later years is highly enticing.

EW hasn’t ranked their list, and I definitely can’t say that all of these look very appetizing (“Abduction”? Really?), but I’d say my top five from these selections would look like:

5. “Drive”
4. “Contagion”
3. “J. Edgar”
2. “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo”
1. “The Ides of March”

I will try to come out with a list of my own must-see list, soon. In the mean time, check out some of the new photos and tidbits over at EW’s official site, here.

The 83rd Academy Awards – Postgame Coverage

March 2, 2011 1 comment

Well, not that I’ve gotten all of that out of my system, I think it’s fitting to move on to the rest of the awards presented Sunday night. As usual, they included some good, some bad, and some just downright ugly.

As far as the the show, itself, was concerned, I’d rate it about a four out of ten. Even in the face of enormous support for them, I remember stating a long time ago that selecting Hathaway and Franco as a hosting pair was just a bad idea. Finally, my convictions have been exonerated. I’m not sure what exactly was going on here, but it didn’t work. I know that Franco is not an idiot, so he was either bored, stage-frought or stoned out of his mind. Whichever path he took, he just was not there in any form of personality. Meanwhile, Anne Hathaway went way over the top in an attempt to overcompensate for Franco’s absence. A few funny lines, but overall, it was a mess.

Yes. On to the awards. I’ve already made my thoughts clear on the results of Best Picture and they are quite strong. However, if there were a race that I would have to object to, equally, if not moreso, it would have to be Best Director. The idea of Tom Hooper winning the award amongst this crop of nominees is more than absurd, it’s hilarious. Hooper’s effort in “The King’s Speech” did not merit him an Oscar and his career is substantially insufficient for such an honor. The Oscar, hands-down, should have gone to David Fincher. The man knew exactly what he wanted and got it to an extent of perfection that you don’t often see in films.

It’s true that David Fincher does not need an Oscar to make it in this industry. He’s widely considered one of the finest directors working in Hollywood and will go on to make extraordinary films. However, there is the notion of awarding in the moment. It’s quite possible that Fincher may never reach the level of perfection that he achieved here. If there’s one thing that history should have taught the Academy, it’s that Martin Scorsese should never have had to wait until “The Departed” to win an Oscar. While being in the company of “Raging Bull” and “Goodfellas” isn’t necessarily a bad thing, it’s sad to imagine that no matter what Fincher eventually wins for, it will be considered a “re-ward.” The Oscars should understand a man’s masterpiece when it’s put in front of their faces.

The only other moments of true disgust occurred in the design categories, which were monopolized by the showy monstrosity that was Tim Burton’s “Alice in Wonderland.” While I predicted Colleen Atwood to take home yet another Oscar for her work on the costumes, I was really kind of hoping that it wouldn’t happen. And seeing the ridiculously gaudy, and really quite ugly, production design conquer some beautiful works of art was a horrible sight. This is an award that I actually would have preferred go to “The King’s Speech,” at least over this. However, it was “Inception”‘s intricately inventive world that was snubbed. Tim Burton’s latest is a film that really shouldn’t be able to hold the title “Academy Award Winner,” especially when none of the design was even built. I mean it’s an entire movie filmed on a green screen.

Most of the great awards of the night, sadly, were the ones that were quite expected. “Toy Story 3” was a lock for the win since the day it opened in theaters. “The Social Network” won for Best Editing because there was really no competition anywhere near in the same ballpark. If a single person didn’t vote for Aaron Sorkin’s absolutely flawless script, I might consider them clinically insane. “Inception”‘s three tech wins were all well-deserved, but it was difficult not to see that sweep occurring, much in the same style as such special-effect wonders as “King Kong,” “The Matrix” and “Jurassic Park.”

It’s hard to argue with the acting wins, even if not a single one of them has differed once, going back from the SAG, to the Golden Globes and the BFCA. The only performer who’s Oscar went hand in hand with an Edgy was Natalie Portman. A truly astonishing performance, the one aspect of “Black Swan” in which recognition is absolutely essential. Firth is definitely not my first choice for Best Actor. However, it’s the type of role that’s difficult not to respect and an actor difficult not to adore. Leo and Bale were both phenomenal and also get props for having the most out-of-control acceptance speeches of the year.

I won’t lie that I have to fly in the face of popular opinion on one issue. I’m very happy that the Academy went back to showing clips for each of the acting nominees rather than just having a bunch of people on stage talking about them. While, it must be nice for the performer to hear their peers praise their work, it’s just another gratuitous way of celebrities patting each other on the back and toasting to their own successes. It’s really kind of grotesque, in a way. Besides, I always looked forward in suspense as to which clip the producers would choose to represent each actor. It’s also a way to present an example of each person’s work for those viewers who haven’t seen all of the performances and in a way that words just can’t substitute.

Perhaps the most bittersweet moment of the night was seeing Wally Pfister receive the award for Best Cinematography. If I was to pick a handful of cinematographers whose work has truly left a mark on the last decade of cinema, Pfister would be at the head of the pack. He is a true master of camera movement and has a perfect eye for lighting a shot. “Inception” is a great exhibition of both these magnificent talents and I couldn’t be happier for him. Yet, one has to wonder, at this point, if the Academy will ever be willing to finally bestow Roger Deakins with his first Oscar. He is one of the most respected directors of photography in the industry, living or dead, and his record with Oscar is now zero for nine. One year, they are really going to have to stop passing him over.

There was one moment of the night that will always live in my memory as a true favorite and that was Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross taking the stage. Even if the Academy isn’t ready to come out of their comfort zone in Best Picture, one really has to give them props for awarding one of the most unorthodox and creative soundtracks ever scored for a substantial film. Reznor and Ross engineered a combination of both traditional rhythms with radical themes of electronic rock tracks. Now that all is said and done, it’s hard to imagine any other type of music narrating “The Social Network.” In a field of fantastic nominees, this year, this is a score that truly stands out. Well done, Academy. One of your better decisions.

Well, that’s my take on the 83rd Annual Academy Awards. While it’s hard to let go of, I believe it’s about time to move on. I believe we have at least a few days time before the race for next year’s Oscars begins, and I’ve got a lot of good stuff in store. Stay tuned.

So, this is where it starts…

September 30, 2010 1 comment

Well, here we go. So many have asked for this, and now they shall receive. This is the counterpart to my life in cinema.

My name’s Thomas Conroy and I live in Chicago, Illinois. I’ve been on this planet for nearly 24 years and for probably the last 18 or 19 of them, my life has been largely dominated by movies. It might have started in 1993 when I first saw Jurassic Park in the theater and had my head spun around my shoulders a few dozen times. Shortly after that experience I discovered that I shared the same birthday as the man behind that particular curtain: Steven Spielberg. Back in the day, I may have thought that was an omen, and maybe it was in some respects. However, I’m positive of only one link that seems indisputably common between the two of us: we both share the same undying passion for the silver screen.

So, here I am, decades later, and my world is no less consumed by the art of cinema than it ever has before. I live and breathe it, at home, at school, at work and in my constant ventures to the local art house or cineplex. I am currently pursuing a Masters Degree in Cinema Production from DePaul University and find myself working on many film projects as a director, writer, editor, grip and electrician. I also put time in helping to maintain a light and sound production stage. Now, while I seem to be slowly breaking my way into the movie-making business, my true passion still lies in watching the finished product…which I do…en masse. I see hundreds of movies a year and constantly re-watch and examine my favorites. In conjunction, I have been a self-proclaimed movie critic professionally, educationally and just for the sheer pleasure of it for ten years. Finally, as if there were any time left over after all that, I am an absolute junkie for Oscar race and love following it at every step. I’ve got my hands full. And thus, we get to this point.

The other day, a good friend of mine asked me what the clear-cut purpose of this blog was for that was an important first step in this journey, and to be honest, I’m not sure that I have one. It’d be too easy to say I did it to please the naggers who were sick of me flooding facebook with my musings and reviews (as if that’s going to stop now that I have a soapbox to stand on). Perhaps this is my way of consolidating the chaotic storm of movies swirling around in my head into one clear vision. Maybe it just gives me a chance to preach to more than just the choir of my own mind about the ever-changing world of film.

Or maybe it just boils down to two things: I love writing and I love movies.

Regardless, I hope that everyone I know (and maybe some folks I don’t) join me on this adventure. In the next few days, I’ll start outlining the shape and scope of what this site will include. Expect a wide array of posts from new reviews, re-visitations to older films, production stories, awards predictions, and general musings about film in general, not to mention a special window into my mind through my own personal lists.

What does this all mean?

“Fasten your seatbelts, it’s going to be a bumpy ride.”